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Sound

Everyone forgets about sound after production. That is, hopefully everyone except for your awesome post-production supervisor, because sound is pretty important in this stage. If you disagree, just try watching something with lousy audio and no soundtrack; you’ll really have to watch, as you won’t want to hear anything during this painfully uncomfortable exercise. From fixing the audio problems in production to compiling the soundtrack to making sure it all blends together, here’s what to keep in mind – and in your budget – for sound in post-production.



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Even in the days of silent film, every screening featured musical accompaniment. So unless you’re planning an experiment in psychological warfare, your project will need a soundtrack. The value of music goes beyond simple entertainment value. The right score or song choice can actually push the audience to accept the core message of the film. While this means you’ll never see a propaganda video without some kind of a rousing song, that’s only because music is an extremely effective tool in filmmaking. The soundtrack can be as vital as the lead actors to the success of any project. So how can you provide a soundtrack for your project? And more importantly, how can you do it without breaking any laws?

TOPICS COVERED IN MUSIC:

  • LICENSING
  • ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS

As with a lot of other technical post-production work, sound mixing only really gets noticed when things go wrong. We’ve probably said this before, but sound problems are way more annoying to audiences than sub-par image quality or imperfect shot composition. Good sound designers and sound mixers pride themselves on being neither seen nor heard…well, actually, only on being heard without audio interference. The art of the audio mix requires process and subtlety in equal measure. So what’s the reward for all this? How about not alienating your entire audience and allowing them to appreciate your project on its own merits.

TOPICS COVERED IN THE “MIX”:

  • STEP ONE | Dialogue/VO/ADR
  • STEP TWO | FX/Foley
  • STEP THREE | Music Mixing
  • STEP FOUR | Final Mix

Resources

Article

John Purcell on Dialogue Editing for Motion Pictures

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Book

Eisenstein on the Audiovisual: The Montage of Music, Image and Sound in Cinema (KINO – The Russian Cinema)

Buy now $32

Article

Assembly Required: A Walter Murch Profile

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Article

Sound from Start to Finish…

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Article

Sound Doctrine Interview With Walter Murch

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webpage

FilmSound.org

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Book

Composing for the Cinema: The Theory and Praxis of Music in Film

Buy now $50
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